Microsoft Logo

MS will take down your content if another user complains!

Microsoft Services Agreement, Section 3.7:

Can Microsoft remove my Content from the Services? Yes. Microsoft will remove, limit distribution of, or disable access to your Content if we determine it’s in violation of this Agreement, we receive a complaint from another user, we receive a notice of intellectual property infringement, or other legal instruction for removal. We may also block delivery of a communication (like email or instant message) to or from the Services as part of our effort to protect the Services or our customers, or otherwise enforce the terms of this Agreement.

This states that Microsoft will, not not just can, remove your content if someone else complains. Forget about Facebook’s lax account takedown rules, MS takes the prize for ridiculous takedown rules. So if you share something on OneDrive, and I don’t like it, all I have to do is complain and they will take it down.

I have contacted Microsoft’s Privacy Questions program about this, and will update the post with their response.

If you like this blog, please send Spotify codes to frodobagginsfll@gmail.com. Thx!

[TUTORIAL] Get Truly Unlimited Cloud Storage

x10 free hosting offers UNLIMITED free space and few outages. So fire up owncloud on your x10 site and you’ve got

1. Sign up for GuHat Free Unlimited Hosting.

2. Create a new custom site.

3. Download the OwnCloud easy setup PHP script and upload it to your site with x10’s cPanel File Manager.

4. Navigate to the script and follow directions.

5. Send me Spotify premium code as an optional thanks!

Video tutorial on the way!

 

UPDATE: there was an error, you need to use GuHat instead of x10, x10 does not allow OwnCloud. Sorry!

Code So Sneaky You Have To Explain It

excellent

Hackaday

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to code a program that leaks information to the user but does so in a way that can’t be discovered in a code audit. This was the challenge for the 2014 Underhanded C contest; the seventh time they’ve held the event. [Richard Mitton] took part and wrote a very entertaining entry. He didn’t win, but he did just share the details of his super-sneaky code.

The challenge set out for the Citizen-Four-like coders set up a scenario where they were writing a program for a shady company (or sketchy government entity) which makes completely secret decisions based on publicly posted social media. The twist is they were tasked with getting code past an audit that leaked the decisions made by this program to the users being secretly observed.

Above is the core trick which [Richard] used after taking inspiration from…

View original post 79 more words

Adding A Backlight To A Cheap Multimeter

Great hacker spirit!

Hackaday

We don’t all need super high quality electronic testing gear. Sometimes second-hand or inexpensive equipment is accurate enough to get the job done. Though it can be a bit annoying to miss out on some of those “luxury” features. [Ekriirke] had this problem with his cheap multimeter. He wished the LCD screen had a backlight for easier visibility, so rather than upgrade to a more expensive unit he just added one himself.

After opening up the multimeter [Ekriirke] found that it ran on a single 12V battery. He realized that the simplest thing to do would be to wire up four white LEDs in series. The four LEDs were arranged within the case off to each side of the LCD, one in each corner. The leads were bent at 90 degree angles and soldered together “dead bug” style. Thin strips of copper foil tape were attached to the PCB in such…

View original post 98 more words